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with our government's top national security priority, which is the lawful effective and humane interrogation of this subject for the purposes of gathering intelligence. the boston attacks were clearly inspired by the violent ideology of transnationallist islamist terrorism. so we need to learn everything we can about what foreign terrorists or terrorist groups the suspect and his brother might have associated with, whether they were part of additional plots to attack our nation, and what other relevant information the suspect may possess that could prevent future attacks against the united states or our interests. i think we need to delve further into this whole issue of the education that some people who are motivated by these base ideologies obtain over the internet and the effect that it's having. we should at least know about that. our civilian justice system offers a responsible option for striking this balance with american citizens. it allows the justice department to delay reading a suspect his miranda rights if doing so is in the interest of -- quote -- "public safety.
is something we should fear right now, since i was born there have been about 50,000 wiretaps approved by law enforcement. every year for last couple years more than 1.5 million requests have been made by law enforcement mostly through technology companies, without us knowing about it we can't find out who did it. there has been a game change over the last 10 years esince 9/11, where pendulum swung way in direction of government actually knowing a hell of a lot more about you know that they used to, that is troubling. neil: i think that the jeannie is out of the bottle, and whether government know spired or not -- inspired or not, the fact is when we hop to web sites, and allow ourselves to be an open book. we open our books, i'm saying where does it go. >> we as people have the right to do that as an individual. if i want to put my entire life out there great, but i can block my cousin and friend from facebook, but to matt's point, people don't know the kind of information that is being compiled from having your grocery store card. neil: government could overstep your block, you know? >> go
only be tried in federal court. he's never eligible for military commissions. a first year law student could convict this person. what i'm worried about is what does he know about future attacks? he's telling us that his brother was the bad guy, he's sort of just along for the ride. they had no international connections. guess what, he's down-playing his involvement. what i am suggesting is that we use the national security legal system where we can interview him without a lawyer to gather intelligence to prevent a future attack, rather than having to negotiate through his lawyer to get any information. jenna: but, if i could, senator, there seems to be a lot of discrepancy about some of the information come being out about this investigation. >> right. jenna: we've all seen it, you know, played out on the news and otherwise. i would like to drill down a little bit into an even change you just had about the boston terror attacks with the s*epbg o secretary of home land security january elt napolitano. we showed an older brother, this tkhaou owe, that is secretary napolitano. we just sh
to remain silent. in a statement may be used against you in a court of law and have the right not to have your all the words used against you. you may consult with an attorney prior to any questioning and you may have the attorney present during questioning. during the entire proceeding, the only time we actually heard the defendant speak was when the subject came up about an attorney kurt the judge says to you understand i have said everything to you about your right to remain silent and there comes a not. and the defendant says no, the court says let the record reflect that i believe the defendant has said no. once again as you say, the court also answer to the record that he was mentally competent and he also appeared to be listed despite his injuries. >> how much more can they get out of him? how long can they talk to him? is there any legal limit or can this go on? >> it can't go on. normally what happens is the next legal step will be the arraignment. during the arraignment that is when he is formally charged and also remember even though he is looking at the charges of using a weap
procedure when the macials take control. before that, it was local law enforcement and the fbi. so the marshalls will be in charge of him, until he is well enough to leave here. once that happen, he will fly out via helicopter, like whitey bowlser did. they feel like that's the best way to take him to his federal holding cell. how that went down today with the arraignment in his room, the federal magistrate was there, a public defender was there. he mostly answered with nods. obviously, he didn't speak a lot. that could be because there are reports of an injury to his neck. the fbi said neck/head region and to his leg and hand. he in serious conditionful he answered questions by nodding. he did say one word, when they asked him if he could afford a defense team, he said no. that's basic lite only words he really did say. the judge asked if he understood what was happening. his miranda rights were read to him. they decided to read him his miranda rights. those were given to him today as well. the security here is very tight. in fact, what is interesting is, he potentially might get
away what he say. i talked to one law enforcement official that has a little built of concern. and the concern is this, that we are finding more and more about his older brother, who obviously went overseas. there's questions about how he trained and he was somebody who was a manipulative personality. withwe are learning how he tookr of his wife, and by some reports pushed her very strongly to convert etch obviously is somebody, as we are hearing reports about his nature you are, was someone who was somewhat aggressive. the worry about a couple law enforcement folks i have spoken to is the younger brother may not have as much information as the older brother would have had. that's something they will learn as we go forward. but now that he's been mirandized, that changes everything as. we. >> adam, thank you. after the fire fight and after running over his brother, he took off. a homeowner sent swarms of police race to go a backyard and suddenly bomber 2, dzhokhar tsarnaev, was surrounded. listen to the dramatic reports leading to his capture. >> a report from watertown of 67
on boston bombing coming up this hour. when we return we're going to get into the law of this case. dzhokhar tsarnaev was formally charged today. he'll be prosecuted through the criminal justice system despite republicans who say he should be treated as an enemy combatant. >>> later, the russian connection. we have new details about the older brother, tamerlan, and his six-month trip overseas to russia, that area, as he became increasingly more devout in his religion and radicalism. >>> here in washington, the marathon bombings have already started to change the debate on things like -- you knew this was coming -- immigration. >>> finally, life started to return to normal this weekend in boston. i was up there as the slow healing begins. this is "hardball." as we say up there, "hardball." the place for politics. >>> he will not be treated as an enemy combatant. we will prosecute this terrorist through our civilian system of justice. >> welcome back to "hardball." that was of course, white house spokesman jay carney short by before 1:00 p.m. today making clear the boston suspect will not be t
flags but i don't think would require calling law enforcement. >> he made two protests on two different incidents. he branded people non-believer. clearly he was getting quite intense about his religion. >> yeah, i think that's where a qualified scholar or leader would need to step in and talk to him and see what his mindset was and from there, make a call on kind of what direction he was taking his religion. >> what has been the reaction in the mosques, both yours and the one of course that tamerlan tsarnaev attended? >> with regards to what? >> well, to what's happened. >> our reaction to what? >> your reaction, your discovery that somebody attending one of the mosques has been the perpetrator of this appalling bombing. >> i think first and foremost as bostonians, our hearts and prayers are with the community. then there's a sense of anger and frustration that someone who would frequent one of our faith institutions would carry out such acts, so people seem to be very angry and upset with what he's done. >> is there any new system that you can put in place to raise more warning flags
clear that there's any law that would allow him to be tried as an enemy combatant. this is a procedure we know works. people get tried in criminal courts every day. the combatant laws we don't know that one can be successfully conducted. that's lost in a mar ras in guantanamo bay. this case will take a long time, be expensive and complicated but he's going to trial and there's going to be a verdict. we know that. >> jeff, thank you very much. fran, julia, as well. appreciate it. follow me on twitte twitter @andersoncooper. what do you think? should he be charged in a criminal court opposed to an enemy combatant? >>> and we will dig in to the case. the older suspect spent last year in parts of dagestan and chechnya. and the older suspect's widow. what we know about her and their relationship and more importantly what the fbi wants to know from her tonight. >>> later, my interview was remarkable woman. i hope you stick around for this. she a dance instructor whose body was broken. she had to have part of her leg amputated below the knee but her spirit is certainly not broken. >> i woke u
will prosecute this terrorist through our civil system of justice. underu.s. law, the united states citizens can not be tried rather in military commissions. martha: but house armed services commission buck mckeown argues that the white house should reconsider. he says, quote, it seems premature to declare that we will not treat tsarnaev as an enemy combatant since we don't know about his affiliations. clearly american citizens must be tried to civilian court, but the same citizen viciously attacked his countrymen, should be exploited for his intelligence value before any trial begins. that will be a debate that rages on for some time on this issue. we'll talk more later in the show with former new york city mayor rudy giuliani. bill: looking forward to that coming up here. meanwhile the feds want to talk to the widow of the suspect, tamerlan. she is mother of 3-year-old daughter between the two. the her lawyer said talks are underway with the feds how to proceed with that. he revealed on the last day tamerlan was home when his wife left for work. martha: well the officers who capturedded dzhokh
at this and her family. reports of involvement by her husband and brother-in-law came as shock. as a mother and a sister, a daughter and wife, katie deeply mourns the pain and loss to innocent victims, students, law enforcement officers and our community. in the aftermath of this tragedy she her daughter and her family are trying to come to terms with this event. >> megyn: joining me now is judge andrew napolitano. so in the news business we get paid to be skeptical. we have a lawyer for the woman who is married to the dead bombing suspect saying she knew nothing about it. the other lawyer said she worked 70 to 80 hours a week as a home health care aide and never saw the husband who was taking care of their toddler daughter. that can easily put you outside the home while the bombs were being made and plans were coming together and ultimately the terrorist attack was coming out. that could all be true. how do we get to the bottom of it? >> the only way the government can get to the bottom of it, if they wanted to get to the bottom from her, she doesn't wanted to speak, is subpoena her before
the process is under way. >> juliette, from a law enforcement standpoint, do you think it was the right decision to try him in civilian court? >> absolutely. like what jeff said, there is just really no debate about this. it's more of a political debate. for one, the law doesn't even cover him because he's a u.s. citizen. but from a law enforcement national security perspective, what better way to minimize the impact of terrorists than to treat them like criminals. that's what they are. if you make them into sort of a bigger deal than he is or anyone is, it sort of gives them a relevance we actually don't want to. so a lot of people in national security and counterterrorism love this idea. not only because of the legal underpinnings behind it but also because it sort of says to anyone who would harm us, you're just a criminal. >> there has also been a lot of successful prosecutions of terrorist suspects in criminal court. >> you can learn a lot of evidence from this. when i first got into this field it was right after the africa bombings, african embassy bombings in '98, and some of the
. >> if people are coming from countries where, perhaps, they grew up under sharia law, i think we can make a safe assumption they have been radicalized. >> lindsey graham was on some show this week saying this shows how we need better tracking. i'm thinking this shows how we need better immigrants. >> how do we give asylum to people from islamic countries, or islamic territories? i would submit people shouldn't be coming here as tourists from check kn chechnya after 9/11. dagestan, chechnya, kyrgyzstan, uh-huh. as george bush would say, none of them stands. >> let me get this right, krystal. asylum is not based on those that may be in desire of leaving countries that we think their policies are no good. asylum is based on who you are. have you ever heard anything more biased and -- and in many ways profiling people just based on their nationality? i mean, it's the exact anti-thesis to what asylum is. >> it's the exact antithesis of everything this country stands for. judging people. not allowing them into this country because of their religion is unbelievable. i would love to know how many
and therefore the younger brother is going to be able to relay that to law enforcement or are they going to continue these sort of dark patches where we have questions that will never be answered. >> last about the latest incident. two men in canada that apparently wanted to derail a train from canada probably headed to the u.s. they are identified as having support from al qaeda in iran. >> right. >> a lot of threads here. do they make sense to you? >> they don't make sense to me. that doesn't mean they aren't true. but as we've learned this week. as we've learned in the past, we should always be cautious about the early reports. one thing the canadian mounted police said there is no state sponsor. even if there is an al qaeda link it's not iran supporting attack. and it makes no sense what iran is doing. we're in negotiations. they're about to have a presidential campaign. this is not the way iran tens to operate. of course al qaeda and injury. she vows to dance again and run in the boston marathon. this is what she had to say to cnn's anderson cooper. >> i landed and was -- sort of cl
involvement. >> the reports of involvement by her husband and brother-in-law came as an absolute shock to them all. >> and in dagestan, the suspect's mother is adamant that her sons are innocent. >> what happened is a terrible thing, but i know that my kids have nothing to do with this. i know it. i am mother. >> joining us now from boston is nbc news national investigative correspondent michael isikoff. and frank silufo, director of the homeland security policy institute at george washington university. good afternoon, to both of you. mike, as the investigations continue both here and oversea, we understand that investigators are confident these brothers acted alone. even as their family members express utter bafflement. what are we learning about the larger case against these suspects? >> reporter: well first of all, this is looking, martin, more and more like a case of self-radicalization. now, nothing is conclusive and, you know, we're far from the end of this investigation right now. >> of course. of course. >> reporter: but the preliminary indicators, first, you have tsarnaev saying the
to die. as if these images weren't chilling enough, today in a newly filed criminal complaint, law enforcement officials described how 19-year-old dzhokhar tsarnaev calmly placed a bag allegedly containing a homemade bomb made out of a pressure cooker and packed with nails and bbs on the ground in a crowd full of innocent bystanders and simply waited. when the first bomb, allegedly placed by his brother, went off nearby, investigators say they could see everybody in the crowd react with alarm. everybody except tsarnaev, who waited a few seconds, walked away, and allegedly set off the sec bomb. days later he and his older brother tamerlan got in a shoot-out with police. today we learn more about the events leading up to that epic clash. according to the new criminal complaint, the night began with the brothers tsarnaev allegedly car jacking a man. the victim describes one of the brothers getting into his car and saying, did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that. the victim says the brother then removed a magazine from his gun, displayed a bullet, and said, i am serious. th
and american law enforcement. >> stephen: yes, the royal canadian mounted police, or mounties, have thwarted an al qaeda-inspired terrorist attack, which is quite a fate considering how hard it is for them to go under cover. folk, i would like to say a word to our friends up north-- you canadians are a brave and heroic people. if i have said it once, this is the one time i said it. ( laughter ) ( applause ) ( cheers ) ladies and gentlemen, i-- i want all my maple-blood brothers to know that we would put it on the line to protect you if there was anyone who disliked you. ( laughter ) so thank you, canada. this is the greatest gift you have given our country since your years of service providing a plausible place for our nonexistent girlfriends to be from. ( laughter ). and i am not-- i am not the only newsman showing canada the proper respect, shep. >> let's get the details. in english and in french. it's how they roll. and they're still saying hole over there and they're going to say hello for a long time. they do-- you know, god love canada but they-- they-- they're not great at the televis
-believe law enforcement trade. doing it all within one week or to put that in political senate terms, three filibusters and a secret poll. as always after the crisis passes, thoughts turn to what does this mean? first, reflections from overseas. >> the czech republic is a european country. it's a different thing than chechnya. >> jon: that is the czech republic ambassador feeling the justified need to explain to an american audience that two similar-sounding foreign nations are not necessarily the same nation. i interrupted you. please go on. >> obviously we've been seeing things on the social media that people are saying that the czech republic and chechnya. the schem republic is a country of central europe and your nato ally. >> jon: who said the czech republic wasn't an ally. do you really think we would overreact to a terror attack on our soil by invading a country that had absolutely nothing to do with... (laughing). ( cheers and applause ). all right. wait a minute. are you calling us stupid? that's disrespectful to get a country bombed. no, no disrespect. the important thing is here
themselves from their now-deceased son-in-law, saying something to the effect he was a monster they never knew. how -- how are her parents dealing with this? >> they are taking it very hard. you know, the dad came out to get the trash last night, and pretty much said no comment. you can see it's taking a heavy toll on the family. you know, katherine glup the suburbs of providence. raised christian, went to college in boston, met tamerlan. she converted to islam, and by all accounts, fairly devout, wore the hajaab, the traditional head scarf. she didn't speak russian, so she wasn't always aware what was being said, she didn't understand the language being spoken around the house. wolf. >> chris lawrence reporting for us. just ahead, still many unanswered questions in the boston marathon terror attack. investigators work to interview the only suspect still alive. new insights into the investigation. stay with our special coverage. ♪ [ male announcer ] a car that can actually see like a human, using stereoscopic cameras. ♪ and even stop itself if it has to. ♪ the technology may be hard
. in the boat. >> unsuccessfully in the throat. he's communicating with law enforcement by writing. by -- i don't know how he's doing it. >> rose: or nodding in some way? >> he's communicate with them. not ideal circumstance, but that's what he's doing. >> rose: do we know whether it's a cooperative way or not? >> it seems to be cooperative. but, again, i don't have any inside information. we don't know as much as we know. and the older brother really got radicalized in a hurry. >> rose: by a trip back to -- >> no, not -- by the time he made his trip back he was already deeply involved in this. >> rose: so why did he go back? >> well, according to the parents, according to the parents he had to go back in order to renew his passpo and he went back for six months. right now we are at the stage where we don't know his exact whereabouts except for that the parents say that the older brother, tamerlan, stayed with them in dagestan, in the capital city and the father claims-- although the father and mother seem wounded and deluded to say the least about their sons' activities-- say that he was with
just yet. as you know, an m.i.t. law enforcement officer was, sean collier was killed on tuesday night and that murder has not been charged yet at all and we should see the state do more work on that front in the coming days and weeks, we expect. >> as you talk about going forward in all this what do we know of how the process progresses from here? there was that legal hearing on monday. what happens next? >> that was just the very beginning, a complaint was filed. he still will have to appear in court, be indicted and there is a hearing set for may 30th at 10:00 a.m. that the judge mentioned in this hearing monday morning. >> before i let you go, erin what do we know about legal defense? did he have legal representation in that hospital room? >> reporter: i have the transcript of the court hearing here there is controversy on friday and over the weekend about him not being mirandized. they went through it twice today and offered the use of an attorney and the one word he spoke was no when asked if he could afford an attorney and he was presented with defense attorneys today. >>> we wa
to fill us in. bob? >> reporter: scott, law enforcement tells us that dzhokhar tsarnaev has indicate he and his brother acted alone use he attack. because he was shot in the neck, the interrogation has been challenging but our sources say he has been cooperating with written answers. today prosecutors needed to hargince a magistrate there was though evidence to charge tsarnaev so they filed a sworn affidavit revealing new details. 2:38 lastdaafrnoon, 11 minutes before t first kiplosion, the tsarnaev brothers were spotted walking each with a heapsack. as they turn tonight boylston street where the marathon was being held. three minutes later they stopped and stood together for one minute. then they split up. tamerlan tsarnaev headed towards the finish line. his younger brother dzohkhar blended in with a crowd of spectators near the forum restaurant. at 2:45 dzohkhar was captured by cameras placing his backpack on the ground. over the next four minutes he spent time looking at his cell phone, app picture and holding the phone near his waist. then he raised it to his ear. 30 seconds later
is come forward with a new structure and to articulate how the rule of law will support protecting the country in this new threat environment. there wasn't a case for treating this brother as an enemy combatant and i think it was very premature for my senate colleagues to call for him to be treated that way. >> congressman, thank you very much. >>> up next the attorney for american wife of tamerlan tsarnaev said she had no knowledge of the attacks. does that add up? and the destructive nature of the pressure cooker bomb and what can be done to stop them? we have a special investigation. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. >>> if you are just joining us, i want to update you on the investigation in to the boston marathon bombings. dzhokhar tsarnaev and what he
filmed here earlier on the week, seen him on the news for the first time. and then for son-in-law reason, he tells me this is dzhokhar and tamerlan, and points at the screen and says here is tamerlan in the blue jacket and dzhokhar in the white jacket. and i say anzor, these are guys with the backpack when the photos are shown. it can't be them. he says i don't know, these are my children. and then his wife grabs the tv screen and starts screaming, i can't be, it can't be happening. i don't believe it. the children are dead. i would have cried out myself. >> reporter: nick walsh, cnn. >>> it was russia that asked the fbi to look into tamerlan tsarnaev's activities back in 2011. moscow said the older brother was increasingly turning to radical islam. bill black joins us now live from moscow where it is 9:36 in the morning. phil, the chronology of this may surprise people, because it seems that the return to radical islam, the request from moscow came before he traveled back to his ancestral homeland. is that the word you're hearing from russian officials, that they were worried even befor
in connection with the attack. abc's dan harris is in boston. >> reporter: law enforcement sources tell abc news the young man seen on the surveillance tape, calmly walking through the crowd with a bomb in his bag, is now being cooperative with investigators. he has trouble speaking because of gunshot wounds to his neck, but he is communicating through writing, nodding his head and making short vocalizations. based on what he has told them, investigators are now convinced there are no more ongoing plots. and abc news has learned dzhokhar tsarnaev told investigators they learned to build a bomb on the internet. dzhokhar tsarnaev was officially charged with using and conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction. the complaint contains vivid new details about the chaotic events of last thursday night when the brothers tsarnaev allegedly carjacked a man. the victim describes one of the brothers getting in the car and saying, did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that. the victim says the brother then removed a magazine from his gun, displayed a bullet and said, i am serious. the victim la
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)